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Activity Catalysing Implementation of the Strategic Action Programme for the Sustainable Management of shared Living Marine Resources in the Caribbean and North Brazil Shelf Large Marine Ecosystems (CLME+)
Country Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Brazil, Barbados, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Mexico, Panama, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Saint Vincent/ Grenadines
Last update: 07/06/2018
Lead organisation organisation details Ministery of Agriculture, Animal Husbandry and Fisheries
Budget US - US Dollar 300,000
Project period 10/05/2017 to 20/12/2019
Countries: Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Brazil, Barbados, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Mexico, Panama, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Saint Vincent/ Grenadines 
Url lvv.getopensocial.com/node/101/ 
Email zojindra@gmail.com
Summary De CLME +'s mariene ecosystemen en de bijbehorende levende mariene rijkdommen zijn bijzonder belangrijk voor de visserij en het toerisme, 2 belangrijkste drijfveren van de economieën in de regio. Binnen de CLME +, worden drie verschillende soorten ecosystemen erkend als de belangrijkste visserij en biodiversiteit. Deze zijn: de riffen en aanverwante systemen, de pelagische ecosysteem, en het continentaal plat ecosysteem.

De CLME + 's mariene ecosystemen en de bijbehorende levende mariene rijkdommen zijn bijzonder belangrijk voor de visserij en het toerisme, 2 belangrijkste drijfveren van de economieën in de regio.
Binnen de CLME +, worden drie verschillende soorten ecosystemen erkend als de belangrijkste visserij en biodiversiteit. Deze zijn: de riffen en aanverwante systemen, de pelagische ecosysteem, en het continentaal plat ecosysteem.
Niet-duurzame visserij, habitat degradatie en vervuiling zijn geïdentificeerd als de drie belangrijkste problemen invloed op de maatschappelijke voordelen verkregen uit deze ecosystemen. Deze effecten kunnen worden verergerd door klimaatverandering.
De meeste visserij volledig of overbevist, en illegale, ongemelde en ongereglementeerde visserij (IOO) nog steeds een belangrijke kwestie in de regio blijft. Habitat degradatie en vervuiling ernstige gevolgen hebben voor de regio toeristisch potentieel en de duurzaamheid van de 'visserij en het verhogen van de kwetsbaarheid van de regio om klimaatschommelingen en verandering. Habitat degradatie en vervuiling van invloed op alle soorten ecosystemen, maar zijn vooral duidelijk in de kustzone.
Diagnostische Analyses (de zogenaamde "TDAS") uitgevoerd onder de CLME project vond de belangrijkste oorzaken van de 3 belangrijkste problemen zijn: zwak bestuur; beperkte personele en financiële middelen; onvoldoende kennis;inadequate publieke bewustwording en participatie; inadequate behandeling van de waarde van ecosysteemdiensten goederen en diensten; bevolking en culturele druk; en handel en externe afhankelijkheid.
Background The region of the Caribbean and North Brazil Shelf Large Marine Ecosystems (the “CLME+ region”) constitutes one of the geopolitically most diverse and complex sets of Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) in the world. Twenty-six independent States and eighteen dependent/associated territories are located within, or border the CLME+. Over the past decades, shared living marine resources in the CLME+ region have become increasingly impacted by habitat degradation, unsustainable fisheries practices and pollution. This situation is now seriously jeopardizing the region’s opportunities for sustainable blue growth. But there is hope. Baseline analyses point to the existence of a multitude of –unfortunately often fragmented and insufficiently coordinated- programmes, projects and initiatives at sub-regional, national and local levels, which aim at reducing environmental stressors, and at achieving enhanced status of ecosystems and fish stocks. However, causal chain analyses conducted under the UNDP/GEF foundational capacity building project “CLME” (GEF ID 1032; 2009-2014) identified weaknesses in transboundary and cross-sectoral governance arrangements as the over-arching root cause for the 3 key transboundary problems cited above. If better articulated and coordinated among each other, and more strongly tied to a solid and enhanced regional governance framework, a substantial increase of the positive impacts of the many ongoing and newly planned efforts in the region could be achieved.During the CLME Project, a “10-year CLME+ Strategic Action Programme for the Sustainable Management of the shared Living Marine Resources of the Caribbean and North Brazil Shelf Large Marine Ecosystems” (the “CLME+ SAP”) was developed and politically endorsed by over 20 CLME+ States. The present UNDP/GEF CLME+ Project (GEF ID 5542; 2015-2019) is a 5-year project that specifically aims at supporting the implementation of this 10-year CLME+ SAP. However, as an ambitious and broad “umbrella” SAP, it is acknowledged that SAP implementation cannot be achieved through a single project or initiative. Rather, better articulation, coordination and collaboration among the wide array of ongoing and newly planned projects and initiatives will be required. The CLME+ project is uniquely positioned in this context to catalyse the implementation of the SAP, and to help achieving the required coordination and integration of efforts.
Given the abundance of projects and initiatives in the region that can deal with stress reduction at the local or national scale, the CLME+ project has clearly identified its niche among all regional projects and initiatives, and therefore puts a major focus on the enhancement of governance architecture and processes. This is strongly reflected in the project’s results framework, and the associated indicators and targets. Whereas substantial actions on stress reduction could be expected from a typical SAP implementation project, in the specific context of the CLME+, and giving due consideration to its scale, uniqueness and complexity, a too strong focus on specific stress reduction measures at the local or sub-regional level would quickly exhaust the available funds under this project (and hence result in unsustainable outcomes), whereas such local or sub-regional actions could very well be addressed by many of the other existing, or newly planned projects and initiatives. None of these other projects and initiatives however would be equally well positioned to address the gaps in the overarching governance arrangements in the CLME+. Whereas modest stress reduction actions are thus foreseen to take place under the CLME+ Project (Component 3), major attention will be given to addressing the root causes of environmental degradation, by strengthening collaborative arrangements and enhancing institutional and human capacity (Component 1, 2 and 3). This will be done while simultaneously evaluating the feasibility and needs, and identifying the resources required, to catalyse an unprecedented upscaling of stress reduction and restoration actions over the next decade. A sound and integrated planning and monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and measure distance-to-targets will be collaboratively developed, through an enhanced, broad “Partnership for the implementation of the CLME+ SAP”.
Objective Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs) are regions of the world's oceans, encompassing coastal areas from river basins and estuaries to the seaward boundaries of continental shelves and the outer margins of the major ocean current systems, and/or occupying semi-enclosed seas. LMEs typically cover relatively large areas, characterized by distinct bathymetry, hydrography, productivity, and trophically dependent populations of marine species (NOAA, 2014). Globally, 66 different LMEs have been delineated. The LME concept was developed by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as a meaningful geospatial unit for the implementation of an ecosystem-based management (EBM) approach. Due to the transboundary nature of many LMEs, their adoption as a management unit generally requires inter-national coordination and collaboration.
Setup and activities Total allocated resources: US$ 146.653.695
GEF US$ 12.500.000, UNDP US$ 2.619.579, Governments US$ 98.117.248, Other Agencies US$ 30.025.349, CSO & Academia US$ 3.391.519


(Expected) Results FAO/Government Cooperative Programme Project agreement was signed in October 2017 Inception workshop was held on 20-24 November 2017 in Port of Spain. The objective was to start the implementation of the CLME+ sub projects on Shrimp and Groundfish, and Strenghtening Ecosystem Based Management Frameworks and Ocean Governance in the North Brazil Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem.
List Keywords
1.1 Socio- economic Sector (OECD) 313 Fishery
3.1 Natural Resource Mgmt. 5. Coastal Zone mgmt
3.2 Pollution-Environmental Protection 3. Ecosystems
Role Person name
Project leader person details 
Project leader person details 
Project leader person details zojindra arjune